Trumpeting Through History

The trumpet is one of the most talked about and noticed instruments in history! From Tutankhamen to the U. S, Army Herald Trumpets of the president, we hear them announcing the arrival of dignitaries of all types. The scope of performance moves through almost every type of ceremony and yet it is capable of playing the most beautiful melodies with soft voices still being heard. When I am performing the music for trumpets, cornets, flugelhorns, and more, I am privileged to visit so many of these places and feelings and hopefully have you along with us.

As a trumpet musician, I am lucky that composers have found a place for our instrument in almost every genre of music and every era of music history as well.

No matter what role we are given, we have to move great sonic distances to be part of the piece. I know I have always thought of musical compositions as plays in which I get to play one or more characters.

So Sound the Trumpet is our opportunity to present many vignettes of what we get to do for a lifetime! Also helping John and I “play” these characters are some of the most rare instruments in the world bringing us closer to that special world.

The instruments themselves come from all over the world! John and I have been collecting for decades and have hundreds of cornets and trumpets. We are truly excited about this concert presentation because we will play as many as possible.

Thank goodness we do not have to go to music school to enjoy concerts! The emotional experiences we have in our daily lives help us to enjoy every type of music if we allow it to. So arpeggios, scales, bleats of the shofar and sonic fanfares are turned into joy, melancholy, joviality, anger, and so many other personal experiences. I know that on stage we will have many emotional swings and hope that you will be moving through every piece and movement with us. Music has the ability to warp our sense of clock time. We hope that we succeed in doing that with Bach to Swing! We are ready to bring the world of trumpet to you!

By Vince DiMartino
George Matton Professor of Music Emeritus

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VinceDiMartinoMBVincent DiMartino retired in 2012 as Matton Professor of Music Emeritus at Centre College. One of America’s leading trumpet performers and teachers, DiMartino originally joined the college in 1993 as Centre’s first distinguished artist-in-residence. He was named to the Matton Professorship in 1996.

 

DiMartino, along with George Foreman, founded the New Columbian Brass Band. DiMartino also is a soloist with the New Sousa Band and is a featured soloist with the Advocate Brass Band. DiMartino is a popular performer at the Great American Brass Band Festival, which annually draws 40,000 people to Danville for outstanding brass music.

A graduate of the Eastman School of Music (B.M. and M.M. degrees), DiMartino was the Alumni Distinguished Professor of Trumpet at the University of Kentucky for some twenty years. He has performed as a soloist with many symphony orchestras, including those in Cincinnati, Buffalo, Santa Fe, Orlando, and Rochester. He is prominently featured in many recordings of the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra.

To read a 20 Questions profile of DiMartino, click here. To read about his Governor’s Lifetime Achievement in the Arts award, click here.

To read “A Conversation with Vincent DiMartino” published upon his retirement in the summer 2012 issue of Centrepiece, click here.

For more information and to purchase tickets to Sound the Trumpets! Click Here.

Categories: Notes from the Faculty

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